Loading…
This event has ended. View the official site or create your own event → Check it out
This event has ended. Create your own
View analytic

Sign up or log in to bookmark your favorites and sync them to your phone or calendar.

Thursday, October 17
 

7:00pm

Miss Nikki and the Tiger Girls

Juliet Lamont

2012 | 75 minutes | Australia, Burma

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

  

How many films combine the giggly fun of an all-girl pop group with rare insights into a country in the throws of transition from military dictatorship to civilian government? In September 2010, oppositionist leader Aung San Suu Kyi would be barred from the general election and a military regime would almost certainly return to power. Against this bleak backdrop an unlikely all-girl group arises when Australian free spirit Miss Nikki May meets hard-headed Burmese entrepreneur Peter Thein. Initially packaged for pop stardom, The Tiger Girls, recently renamed the Me N Ma Girls, begin a long and rocky journey toward self-expression, and with every step the women take toward freedom and actualization—the lyrics of their pop confections often brandishing a surprising feminist edge—Myanmar’s political situation marches in tandem. The film, which we are thrilled to present to opening night of the 2013 Margaret Mead Film Festival, ultimately tells two interwoven stories of remarkable change and courage.

Co-presented by the Asia Society

The opening night welcome will be introduced by Dr. Mary Catherine Bateson, daughter of festival namesake, Margaret Mead.

 


Thursday October 17, 2013 7:00pm - 9:30pm
LeFrak IMAX Theater

7:00pm

Miss Nikki and the Tiger Girls - Opening Night Film and Reception

Juliet Lamont

2012 | 75 minutes | Australia, Burma

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

  

How many films combine the giggly fun of an all-girl pop group with rare insights into a country in the throws of transition from military dictatorship to civilian government? In September 2010, oppositionist leader Aung San Suu Kyi would be barred from the general election and a military regime would almost certainly return to power. Against this bleak backdrop an unlikely all-girl group arises when Australian free spirit Miss Nikki May meets hard-headed Burmese entrepreneur Peter Thein. Initially packaged for pop stardom, The Tiger Girls, recently renamed the Me N Ma Girls, begin a long and rocky journey toward self-expression, and with every step the women take toward freedom and actualization—the lyrics of their pop confections often brandishing a surprising feminist edge—Myanmar’s political situation marches in tandem. The film, which we are thrilled to present to opening night of the 2013 Margaret Mead Film Festival, ultimately tells two interwoven stories of remarkable change and courage.

Co-presented by the Asia Society

The opening night welcome will be introduced by Dr. Mary Catherine Bateson, daughter of festival namesake, Margaret Mead.

Screening will be followed by a Reception with the 2013 Mead Festival Filmmakers in the Hall of Gems and Minerals


Thursday October 17, 2013 7:00pm - Friday October 18, 2013 12:00am
LeFrak Theater and Hall of Gems and Minerals
 
Friday, October 18
 

12:00pm

Seeing Ethnography with Zoe Bray

Presented by Ethnographic Terminalia

Free with a 2013 Mead Ticket Stub

What does it mean to visually capture people and cultures? To spark that conversation, this year’s Mead Film Festival is collaborating with the art and anthropology collective Ethnographic Terminalia to put the anthropologist front and center. University of Nevada anthropologist and artist Zoe Bray will showcase her unusual and innovative style of ethnography by live-painting a local subject in the Museum’s Grand Gallery for the duration of the festival. Stop by to watch Dr. Bray at work, discover her visual research methods, and consider how ethnography is practiced.


Friday October 18, 2013 12:00pm - 5:45pm
The Grand Gallery

12:00pm

People’s Park
The Margaret Mead Film Festival invites you to spend a whole afternoon in the park… without leaving the Museum. People’s Park, a single 78-minute shot, takes observational documentary to glorious extremes with an uninterrupted journey into an urban park in Chengdu, China. Couples waltz, sycamores drift in the wind, and a hypnotic rhythm is forged from the park’s ambient soundscape paired with glimpses of public leisure in Chinese culture. The film will be shown on a loop as an installation, so visitors can drift in and out of the room or become virtual flâuneurs, immersing themselves in the scenes for hours to experience what one critic called “a pure kind of cinema magic…[that] makes it more real than real.”

Friday October 18, 2013 12:00pm - 6:00pm
The Astor Turret

5:00pm

Finding Hillywood

Leah Warshawski and Chris Towey

2013 | 58 minutes | U.S., Rwanda

New York Premiere | Directors in Attendance

A unique chronicle of the very beginning of Rwanda's film industry, this phenomenon film captures the concurrent threads of hope and horror that define modern life after the genocide: the urge to move forward and embrace the future and the impossibility of escaping the moral devastation of the past. As pioneers bring locally made films to rural communities on a giant inflatable screen, thousands come for their first experience of cinema, watching in stadiums that were built next to mass graves. Centered around one man’s efforts to use film both to heal his country and to face his own history, Finding Hillywood deftly fuses the personal and the universal to tell a story about the role art can play in rebuilding a broken society.

Friday October 18, 2013 5:00pm - 6:30pm
Kaufmann

5:30pm

Calle López

Gerardo Barroso and Lisa Tillinger

2013 | 80 minutes | Mexico

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

This film occupies an unusual place somewhere between visual anthropology and art-house cinema: it offers up a microcosm of Mexican society, alive with implicit social commentary, but plays as a stunning work of cinematic poetry. Two photographers, Gerardo Barroso and Lisa Tillinger, move with their baby to the busy Calle López in historic downtown Mexico City, a bustling cauldron of everyday life so textured and vibrant that they become inspired to document it. Following the street’s residents with their cameras, they capture a parade of street vendors, beggars, and tequeros that becomes a kind of urban symphony in black and white.


Friday October 18, 2013 5:30pm - 7:15pm
People Center

6:00pm

Village at the End of the World

Sarah Gavron and David Katznelson

2012 | 76 minutes | U.K., Greenland (Denmark)

U.S. Premiere


Village at the End of the World presents a rich real-life human drama, full of humor and hope, set against a backdrop of steadily melting ice that portends larger ecological changes for the whole planet. The Inuit village of Niaqornat in Northern Greenland grapples with many of the same challenges as other small communities around the world: a dwindling population; a lack of industry and jobs threatening the local economy; traditional ways of life giving way to modernity. It also happens to be one of the most remote human habitations on Earth. Lars, the only teenager in town, dreams of a different life and plans his escape even as the community pulls together to try to reopen the fish factory and revive its prospects for the future.


Friday October 18, 2013 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Linder

7:00pm

Tales From the Organ Trade

Ric Esther Bienstock

2013 | 82 minutes | Canada, U.S., Turkey, Kosovo, Israel, Philippines, Moldova

New York Premiere | Director in Attendance

Every 60 minutes a human organ is sold illicitly. Can you put yourself in the place of a buyer? A seller? What would you do if your life depended on it? This riveting, gritty, and unflinching film, narrated by David Cronenberg, explores the shadowy life and death world of international black market organ trafficking, delving deeply into the legal, and ethical issues that swirl around its center, its fringes, and its darkest depths. Street-level brokers, rogue surgeons, exploitation and salvation of the rich and the impoverished—it’s an infernal drama of endless moral complexity, which this film captures with an incredibly nimble grace, compassion, and even-handedness.

Co-presented by HBO Documentary Films


Friday October 18, 2013 7:00pm - 8:30pm
Kaufmann

8:00pm

This Ain’t No Mouse Music!

Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling

2013 | 92 minutes | U.S.

New York Premiere | Directors in Attendance

Roots music icon Chris Strachwitz is a detective of sounds, an archaeologist of deep American music, the antithesis of the corporate “mouse music” that dominates the American ear. Born a German count, Strachwitz fled his homeland after World War II at 16. In the U.S., he began to carry his tape recorder from sharecropper shacks to roadside honkytonks, from cantina dives to wild blues clubs. His recordings on his indie label, Arhoolie Records, brought Cajun music out of Louisiana, Tex-Mex out of Texas, blues out of the country—and into the living rooms of middle America. These recordings revolutionized the sound of American music. In This Ain't No Mouse Music! filmmakers Chris Simon and Maureen Gosling join Strachwitz for a hip-shaking stomp through the fertile ground of this country’s roots music, as Strachwitz continues his passionate quest for the soul of America.

Friday October 18, 2013 8:00pm - 10:00pm
Linder

8:30pm

Three Voices (Diario a Tres Voces)

Three Voices (Diario a Tres Voces)

Otilia Portillo Padua

2012 | 61 minutes | Mexico

New York Premiere


Monserrat, 15 years old and effervescent, is asked out for the first time. Nora, 50 and divorced, pursues her former beauty through psychic healing. Aldegunda, 90 and a great-aunt, recalls her early romantic thrills and mishaps. Together, these women tell a universal story in Otilia Padua’s rich portrait. The film is shot almost exclusively indoors and at home, exploring the intimacy and confinement of interior spaces in the protagonists’ lives. Padua’s skilled eye for spatial relations—she’s trained as an architect—along with a rich visual palette of ‘40s Technicolor films, frame archival and original footage into an expressive study of womanhood in Mexico.


Friday October 18, 2013 8:30pm - 9:45pm
People Center
 
Saturday, October 19
 

11:30am

Fernando Cellicion in Perfomance

Admission is free with 2013 Mead Ticket Stub | The beautiful and mesmerizing sound of Native American Zuni music will fill the Museum as internationally renowned Zuni artist Fernando Cellicion performs a series of songs from the Zuni pueblo. This performance showcases contemporary Zuni culture in conjunction with the Mead Dialogue Setting the Record Straight


Saturday October 19, 2013 11:30am - 12:30pm
The Hall of Birds of the World

12:00pm

Emerging Visual Anthropologists Showcase

In this special showcase we present three of the finest shorts to come out of the Visual Anthropology tradition. Laura Murray’s A Kiss for Gabriela tells the story of Gabriela Leite, the first sex worker to run for Brazilian Congress, and who in 2010 faced down 822 opponents and a male-dominated political system, becoming a cultural icon in the process. Doing the Sheep Good, by Teresa Montoya, charts the life of the films and photographs in the series Navajo Film Themselves, made by Navajo youth who were taught to use cameras as part of a 1966 experiment by two anthropologists, as they are about to be repatriated to their community. Tonto Plays Himself, by the devoted cinephile Jacob Floyd, confronts the filmmaker’s anxieties about representations of Native Americans in film as he explores the 1930s and ‘40s career of his actor cousin Victor Daniels, a.k.a. Chief Thundercloud.

 

This year’s theme invites audiences to come to the Museum to engage in the powerful experience of seeing culture on film. It is an invitation to come to the festival to see new reflections of “your” ”self,” to have audiences understand themselves in relation to other individuals and to various communities. It invites viewers to reflect on ways of seeing—how we perceive visual culture and how our identities shape how we look and what we see. The theme also raises questions about what it means to authentically see something for yourself—do you need to be in a place physically to understand a place or its cultures? Or how can we be transported to “see for ourselves” through film?


Saturday October 19, 2013 12:00pm - 2:00pm
Linder

12:00pm

Seeing Ethnography with Zoe Bray

Presented by Ethnographic Terminalia

Free with a 2013 Mead Ticket Stub

What does it mean to visually capture people and cultures? To spark that conversation, this year’s Mead Film Festival is collaborating with the art and anthropology collective Ethnographic Terminalia to put the anthropologist front and center. University of Nevada anthropologist and artist Zoe Bray will showcase her unusual and innovative style of ethnography by live-painting a local subject in the Museum’s Grand Gallery for the duration of the festival. Stop by to watch Dr. Bray at work, discover her visual research methods, and consider how ethnography is practiced.


Saturday October 19, 2013 12:00pm - 5:45pm
The Grand Gallery

12:00pm

People's Park
The Margaret Mead Film Festival invites you to spend a whole afternoon in the park… without leaving the Museum. People’s Park, a single 78-minute shot, takes observational documentary to glorious extremes with an uninterrupted journey into an urban park in Chengdu, China. Couples waltz, sycamores drift in the wind, and a hypnotic rhythm is forged from the park’s ambient soundscape paired with glimpses of public leisure in Chinese culture. The film will be shown on a loop as an installation, so visitors can drift in and out of the room or become virtual flâuneurs, immersing themselves in the scenes for hours to experience what one critic called “a pure kind of cinema magic…[that] makes it more real than real.”

Saturday October 19, 2013 12:00pm - 8:30pm
The Astor Turret

1:00pm

Setting the Record Straight

Nearly a century after Museum anthropologists first recorded a sacred ceremony of the Zuni tribe, a rare archival film is getting its second life. Through a groundbreaking collaboration between the Museum’s Cultural Resources Office, Museum archivists and anthropologists and the Zuni A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center, the 1923 silent film The Shalako Ceremony at Zuni, New Mexico has been updated with Zuni inter-titles and narration. View this never-before-seen community-edited version at a special screening, then hear from an expert panel moderated by Jim Enote, director of A:shiwi A:wan Museum and Heritage Center about the history and repercussions of filming sacred ceremonies of the Zuni—and how repurposing archival films can create new, contemporary meanings.

Panelists include Dr. Peter Whiteley, Museum curator of North American Ethnology, Barbara Mathe, Museum Archivist and Curtis Quam and Octavius Seowtewa from Zuni.


Saturday October 19, 2013 1:00pm - 2:30pm
People Center

1:00pm

Cinéma Inch'Allah!

Vincent Coen and Guillaume Vandenberghe

2012 | 80 minutes | Belgium

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

Cinéma Inch’Allah! is a moving exploration of the struggle of four young Belgian-Moroccan men to reconcile artistic passion with religious belief, family obligations, and their place as Muslim filmmakers in modern Belgian society. Now in their thirties, Reda, Mohamed, Farid, and Nourredine have worked together since adolescence on more than 30 low-budget comic action movies. With infectious enthusiasm, they have thrown themselves into their collective endeavor, often starring in their own films and using their work not only to channel their fears and aspirations but as a way of projecting an image of themselves to their community and the outside world. Cinéma Inch’Allah! captures them at a pivotal moment, when one member of the group decides to radically change his life, threatening their common artistic goals and even their friendship.

Co-presented by Flanders House and Park51

 


Saturday October 19, 2013 1:00pm - 2:45pm
Kaufmann

2:30pm

How Far Is Heaven preceded by Queen of the Desert

How Far Is Heaven

Miriam Smith and Christopher Pryor

2012 | 99 minutes | New Zealand

U.S. Premiere | Directors in Attendance

This is a story of powerful dualities: Maori and Christian spirituality, gang parties and prayers, pig hunting and perfume appreciation. It unfolds in an isolated village known both as Jerusalem and Hiruharama, home for the last 120 years to New Zealand’s only homegrown Catholic order, the Sisters of Compassion. Through the four seasons, the film focuses on Sister Margaret Mary, the newest sister, as she and the other two remaining sisters engage with the broader community. Conflicting feelings arise as their daily spiritual practices meet those of the Maori community, as the juxtaposition reveals parallel but ultimately fundamentally different approaches to navigating the harsh realities of life.

Queen of the Desert

Alex Kelly

2012 | 28 minutes | Australia

New York  Premiere | Director in Attendance

Starlady Nungari, a real-life Priscilla Queen of the Desert, is a flamboyant hairdresser trainer and youth worker who, armed with only a bottle of bleach, a pair of scissors, and an irrepressible nature, first opened a salon in the indigenous community of Kintore in Central Australia. Now she takes her show on the road, traveling thousands of miles to bring her mobile hair workshops to some of Australia’s most isolated teenagers. Her efforts to engage the kids in Areyonga, a remote Pitjantjatjara town, reveal the ongoing battle with depression and drug abuse that besets the entire region. Will she be able to pull off Areyonga’s first-ever fashion show against the odds?

Saturday October 19, 2013 2:30pm - 4:45pm
People Center

3:00pm

Tea or Electricity (Le Thé ou l'Electricité)

Tea or Electricity (Le Thé ou l'Electricité)

Jérôme le Maire

2012 | 93 minutes | Belgium, France, Morocco

New York Premiere

The implementation of electricity in a tiny isolated village in the middle of the Moroccan High Atlas is an occasion for anticipation, joy, and the unintended consequences of predatory capitalism. Shot season after season, this gorgeously filmed story slowly reveals how the people of Ifri join the grid of modern civilization. Before our eyes, a small village and a way of life are transformed by the comforts and complications of connecting to the rest of the world. The villagers yearn for modernization, and the electric company is eager to invest in new customers.  As we watch the inevitable effects that electrical tools—lights, cell phones, and televisions—have on their way of life, the film builds upon itself to eventually illuminating the transformation of social values by technological progress.

Co-presented by the Human Rights Watch Film Festival


Saturday October 19, 2013 3:00pm - 4:45pm
Linder

3:30pm

Chimeras

Mika Mattila

2013 | 90 minutes | Finland, China

New York Premiere | Director in Attendance

Set in China’s turbulent contemporary art world, Chimeras offers an intense reflection on modern Chinese identity. The story interweaves the parallel narratives of a young man taking the Beijing art scene by storm and an aging international pop-art star questioning his own legacy. When an American curator invites Liu Gang to show his artwork in the most prestigious gallery in China, the young photographer from modest means is thrust into a whirlwind of Westernized luxury, embassy parties, and promises of an international career. He struggles to balance his life as an artist with his responsibilities to his family and his fiancée. As Liu begins to wonder who he is and where he is heading, his questions find an echo in Wang Guangyi—an older, established artist who achieved international fame, enormous wealth, and artistic fulfillment during the “second revolution” of the 1980s. Wang was on the forefront of modernizing China with revolutionary Western avant-garde ideas, but now he is filled with doubt about the dominance of outside influence in the Chinese art world. He  bitterly rails against the value of the Western ideals he once championed, and his story, juxtaposed with Liu’s, raises profound questions about authenticity and cultural voice in art.  


Saturday October 19, 2013 3:30pm - 5:30pm
Kaufmann

5:00pm

Makers and Scholars Salon

Free with a 2013 Mead Ticket Stub

The Mead has always been a destination for scholars, makers and audiences to meet, discuss, and consider the future of visual anthropology, new kinds of cultural storytelling, and the use of media in engaged anthropological practice. This year, we have invited artists, scholars, and media makers to discuss how their work explores the boundaries of art and anthropology.  Drawing on a significant historical tradition of ethnographic documentary, the panel participants will discuss how they are developing innovations in mediating culture both on and off screen through collaborative projects, new ways of interacting with audiences, and the possibilities offered by new media.

Introduced and moderated by Dr. Faye Ginsburg, NYU, Center for Media, Culture and History

Co-presented by Union Docs


Saturday October 19, 2013 5:00pm - 7:00pm
Wallach Orientation Center

5:30pm

Black Out preceded by The Barrel

Black Out

Eva Weber | 2012 | 47 minutes | U.K., Guinea

The Sun sets over Conakry, but only a smattering of flickering lights interrupt the enveloping darkness. Eighty percent of the population in Guinea is without electricity and what does exist, mainly in the capital, is intermittent. This evocative and poignant documentary reveals a striking phenomenon hidden in these shadows: school children, driven by a desire and to learn and improve their lives and their country, who travel miles on foot to the airport, to gas stations, to parks in wealthy neighborhoods in order to have light to study by. 

The Barrel (El Galón)

Anabel Rodríguez Ríos | 2013 | 11 minutes | South Africa, U.K., Venezuela | U.S. Premiere

The Barrel shows us life in a floating village through a child’s eyes while juxtaposing the poverty and wealth that coexist on the fringes of Venezuela’s oil industry. Every day 832,000 barrels of oil are extracted from Maracaibo Lake, each one worth U.S. $100. Luis, 13, whose family lives on a floating village in the middle of the lake on less than $150 per month, wants a used oil barrel more than anything so he can make a boat and enter a race.

Co-presented by Tribeca Film Festival


Saturday October 19, 2013 5:30pm - 6:45pm
Linder

5:30pm

Metamorphosen

Sebastian Mez

2012 | 84 minutes | Germany, Russia

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance


A harrowing cinematic conjuring of a danger that can’t be physically perceived and of the strength of a people who bear its weight, Metamorphosen chronicles life near the Mayak nuclear facility in Russia’s Southern Urals region. Still in operation, Mayak was the first plant for the production of fissile material for nuclear weapons in the Soviet Union. Although unknown to the general public, accident upon accident at Mayak repeatedly irradiated the area, affecting the people and nature in the area in untold ways. This carefully constructed documentary, more impressionistic than investigative, explores the impact of those accidents, illuminating along the way the resilience of those who coexist with this constant, invisible menace.

Co-presented by CEC Artslink


Saturday October 19, 2013 5:30pm - 7:00pm
People Center

6:00pm

As Time Goes By in Shanghai

Uli Gaulke

2013 | 90 minutes | Germany, The Netherlands, China

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

As Time Goes By in Shanghai captures a city and a country in flux through the eyes of the venerable Peace Old Jazz Band, a group that has played together for more than 30 years and includes musicians who have been performing since the 1940s. Jazz and their dedication to it have endured as the world around them has continuously transformed, from the Japanese occupation through the Cultural Revolution to today’s turbo-charged capitalist society. As Shanghai remakes itself again and again, and China with it, they watch, and they play. With rare insights into this most mutable city as a backdrop, the film follows the band across the world to the Rotterdam’s North Sea Jazz Festival on a journey that crystallizes the joy and hope they find in their music.


Saturday October 19, 2013 6:00pm - 8:00pm
Kaufmann

7:30pm

A Self-Made Man preceded by The Infamous T

A Self-Made Man

Lori Petchers

2013 | 56 minutes | U.S.

NY Premiere | Director in Attendance

This moving documentary examines the social and psychological dynamics of being transgender through an intimate portrait of trans youth advocate Tony Ferraiolo. Tony guides children as young as eight and their parents through the confusing journey of defining themselves when their physical appearance conflicts with their self-image. Even as he struggles to come to terms with the complexities of his own life as transgender person, he labors to offer safety and assurance to families immersed in an often frightening transition. A Self-Made Man navigates the issues the protagonist and his charges face with a tone both candid and compassionate—much like Tony himself.

The Infamous T

Melissa Koch

2013 | 30 minutes | U.S.

New York Premiere | Director in Attendance

This story of Jonathan, a vibrant 18-year-old sinking under the weight of his lot in life, distills the trials of a segment of queer youth in America. Homeless, bullied, and failing out of high school, Jonathan seems about to find stability when a GLBT host program matches him with a middle-class family. Struggling to adjust after a lifetime of homophobia and poverty, he’s ultimately redeemed by the love of his chosen family and friends.

Co-presented by NewFest and The Trevor Project

This screening will be followed by a Q&A featuring Tony Ferraiolo and moderated by Steve Mendelsohn, co-president of NewFest and deputy director of The Trevor Project.

Saturday October 19, 2013 7:30pm - 9:15pm
Linder

8:00pm

Allan Baldwin: In Frame preceded by Irish Folk Furniture

Allan Baldwin: In Frame  

Tearepa Kahi

2011 | 52 minutes | New Zealand

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

This loving examination of the photographer-turned-historian Allan Baldwin’s extraordinary work on traditional Maori tattoos is part historical document, part tribute to some of the last practitioners of a dying traditional art form. Baldwin’s magnificent photographs from the ‘60s and ‘70s, which inspired Michael King’s famous 1972 book Moko: Maori Tattooing in the 20th Century, are the product of a chance encounter on Baldwin’s adoptive home of the central North Island of New Zealand. Coming upon a Maori female elder with a moko, which he had believed were all gone, he asked if he could take her picture. That episode, like the many that followed it, combined to make up an extraordinary pictorial record that is also a testament to Baldwin’s character.

Irish Folk Furniture

Tony Donoghue

2012 | 9 minutes | Ireland

Traditional farmhouse furniture in Ireland has its own culture and social history; old hand-painted pieces are often associated with hard times and poverty. This charming and beautifully composed stop-motion animated short lightens the weight of this history, following 16 pieces of what in many places would be considered folk art through repair, restoration, and their return home.

 


Saturday October 19, 2013 8:00pm - 9:30pm
People Center

8:30pm

Gringo Trails

SOLD OUT - A timely documentary raises urgent questions about how we travel and the unintended cultural and environmental consequences of tourism around the globe. Gringo Trails follows well-worn travelers’ routes through Latin America and beyond to Africa and Asia. The film reveals the complex relationships between colliding cultures, such as the host countries’ need for financial security and the tourists who provide it in their quest for authentic experiences. Through the stories of both travelers and locals, and with stunning footage from Bolivia, Thailand, Mali, and Bhutan, Gringo Trails explores the dramatic impact of travel and tourism around the world over the past 30 years.


Saturday October 19, 2013 8:30pm - 9:49pm
Kaufmann

10:00pm

The Shanghai Restoration Project

Free with a 2013 Mead Ticket Stub

Drawing its creative inspiration from Chinese jazz bands from the 1930’s, The Shanghai Restoration Project, led by Dave Liang, presents a musical feast that blends Chinese sounds with Western hip-hop and electronica, accompanied by rich original visuals.

 


Saturday October 19, 2013 10:00pm - Sunday October 20, 2013 12:00am
Wallach Orientation Center
 
Sunday, October 20
 

12:00pm

Seeing Ethnography with Zoe Bray

Presented by Ethnographic Terminalia

Free with a 2013 Mead Ticket Stub

What does it mean to visually capture people and cultures? To spark that conversation, this year’s Mead Film Festival is collaborating with the art and anthropology collective Ethnographic Terminalia to put the anthropologist front and center. University of Nevada anthropologist and artist Zoe Bray will showcase her unusual and innovative style of ethnography by live-painting a local subject in the Museum’s Grand Gallery for the duration of the festival. Stop by to watch Dr. Bray at work, discover her visual research methods, and consider how ethnography is practiced.


Sunday October 20, 2013 12:00pm - 5:45pm
The Grand Gallery

12:00pm

People's Park
The Margaret Mead Film Festival invites you to spend a whole afternoon in the park… without leaving the Museum. People’s Park, a single 78-minute shot, takes observational documentary to glorious extremes with an uninterrupted journey into an urban park in Chengdu, China. Couples waltz, sycamores drift in the wind, and a hypnotic rhythm is forged from the park’s ambient soundscape paired with glimpses of public leisure in Chinese culture. The film will be shown on a loop as an installation, so visitors can drift in and out of the room or become virtual flâuneurs, immersing themselves in the scenes for hours to experience what one critic called “a pure kind of cinema magic…[that] makes it more real than real.”

Sunday October 20, 2013 12:00pm - 8:30pm
The Astor Turret

1:00pm

Iceland Year Zero

Sigurður Hallmar Magnússon

2012 | 52 minutes | Iceland

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance


In October 2008, Iceland’s three main banks collapsed, driving what had been one of the most stable and prosperous nations in the world into bankruptcy and erasing the assets and jobs of thousands of its citizens. Iceland Year Zero looks at the aftermath of the crisis, documenting the personal stories of people from a range of social and economic backgrounds and arriving at a surprising picture of a society on the brink of despair but willing to reassess its capitalist values in the name of hope.

Co-presented by Scandinavia House


Sunday October 20, 2013 1:00pm - 2:15pm
People Center

1:00pm

The Beautiful Game

“Soccer,” Desmond Tutu says in this inspiring documentary, “isn’t like a religion in Africa. It is bigger than religion." Uniting the continent in a passionate common dialogue, the game has the power to unite, uplift, heal—and corrupt. The Beautiful Game tells dynamic stories from six countries—Kenya, Egypt, South Africa, Nigeria, Ghana, and Ivory Coast—ranging in tone and theme from inspirational to tragic, personal to universal, that reveal the powerful place soccer occupies in cultures across the continent. Woven together with commentary from such various observers as Archbishop Tutu, Kofi Anan, F. W. de Klerk, will.i.am, Femi Kuti, and a who’s who of African soccer stars, the stories coalesce into a deeply affecting picture of the modern continent in the full grip of its aspirations and struggles.


Sunday October 20, 2013 1:00pm - 2:24pm
Kaufmann

1:30pm

Dennis O'Rourke Tribute

In celebration of the life of the late Dennis O'Rourke (1945-2013) and his critical contributions to the field of cultural storytelling and anthropology, the 2013 Mead Film Festival presents a tribute screening of O’Rourke’s classic Cannibal Tours preceded by the U.S. premiere of Framing the Other, a film with contemporary echoes of O’Rourke’s seminal work. The program will feature an opportunity to discuss O’Rourke’s legacy and the continuing issues around cultural tourism.

Cannibal Tours
Dennis O'Rourke
1988 | 70 minutes | Australia, Papua New Guinea

When tourists journey to the furthermost reaches of the Sepik River in Papua New Guinea, is it the indigenous tribespeople or the white visitors who are the oddity? Cannibal Tours explores the differences, and the surprising similarities, that emerge when "civilized" and "primitive" people meet. Originally released in 1988 to much acclaim and controversy, the film remains an ageless and timeless meditation on cultural tourism. It is a pointed look at a strange phenomenon, set on a luxury cruise with a twist. Chock-full of dry humor and acute observations, Cannibal Tours is out to explode cultural assumptions.

 

Framing the Other
Ilja Kok and Willem Timmers
2011 | 25 minutes | Netherlands, Ethiopia
U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

The women of the Mursi tribe of southern Ethiopia wear lip plates and vibrant jewelry, a custom that has spawned a lively tourist trade as Western visitors pay to take photographs—the more embellished the adornment, the higher the price. This humorous and sometimes uncomfortable film follows a tour group visit to the Mursi, raising provocative questions about authenticity and the motivations and economics of “cultural tourism.”


Sunday October 20, 2013 1:30pm - 3:15pm
Linder

3:00pm

Heart of Sky, Heart of Earth

Frauke Sandig and Eric Black

2011 | 98 minutes | Germany, Guatemala, Mexico

New York Premiere | Directors in Attendance

How do the Maya of today feel about their ancestors’ conviction that the world would end in the year 5125 (2012 by our calendar) and a new cycle would arise? What can their worldview tell us about our global society where corporations go to the ends of the Earth to extract all resources and value? This thoughtful and provocative film follows six young Maya in Guatemala and Chiapas through their daily lives, forgoing narration to allow them to put forth their indigenous perspective in their own words. The stories that emerge over the course of years of filming all interweave the beauty and fragility of nature and the creation myth of the Popol Vuh with various aspects of today’s industrialized and hyper-connected world in crisis. The ruins of ancient Mayan civilization, often in the background, provide a reminder of our own possible fate.

Co-presented by Cinema Tropical


Sunday October 20, 2013 3:00pm - 4:45pm
People Center

3:30pm

Mallamall

Lalita Krishna

2012 | 74 minutes | Canada, India

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

Mallamall, which literally translated means “bountiful goods,” offers a fascinating look at the struggle playing out on the battlefield of global capitalism. India is in the throes of a retail revolution as a burgeoning middle class looks for more Western goods and services. Modern malls have arrived to meet the demand, radically shifting the shopping culture and threatening the livelihood of traditional merchants. The landscape of retail is transforming from vibrant open-air markets with jewel-colored saris, aromatic spices, and feisty personalities to homogeneous, clean, and meticulously branded chain stores. One set of Indians is jumping on the modern mall bandwagon, enjoying new luxuries and heading up local efforts to further international investment. Another set vehemently protests the forces of globalization, fighting for the rights of thousands of bazaar owners and small farmers, as well as for a centuries-old way of life.


Sunday October 20, 2013 3:30pm - 5:00pm
Kaufmann

4:00pm

Firing Imaginations: Pioneering Traditional Storytelling Through Digital Games

Free with a 2013 Mead Ticket Stub

As a medium for storytelling, video games offer incredible potential—and now an exciting new partnership is looking to harness that power to bring Alaska Native culture to screens around the world. Leading game developer E-Line Media and Alaska’s Cook Inlet Tribal Council are collaborating on Upper One Games, the first game company owned by an indigenous community in the U.S., to develop commercial video games that draw on a rich, centuries-old storytelling tradition. Upper One Games CEO Gloria O’Neill and E-Line Media President Alan Gershenfeld will offer an inside view at the opportunities and challenges of bringing a culture’s stories, and wisdom passed down through the generations, to an interactive digital format.

Co-presented by Games for Change


Sunday October 20, 2013 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Wallach Orientation Center

4:00pm

When I Walk

Jason DaSilva

2013 | 85 minutes | U.S., India

Director in Attendance


Seven years and 3,600 hours of footage after being diagnosed with multiple sclerosis, Jason DaSilva brings an intimate portrait of his own physical decline to the big screen with When I Walk. In a culture where disability is often simplified into a character trait—he is disabled, she is disabled—When I Walk asks about disability as a process. When do you become disabled in your journey from able-bodied? What are the pivotal moments indicating your life will never be as it once was? DaSilva’s story elegantly and tragically unfolds with the camera pointed ever inward. Harrowing but optimistic, his story reminds us of the beauty of fleeting moments, the importance of silliness, and the indomitable spirit of humanity.


Sunday October 20, 2013 4:00pm - 5:30pm
Linder

5:30pm

Alto do MInho preceded by Rougarouing

Alto do MInho

This spellbinding film dispenses with not only dialogue but also most other conventions of documentary filmmaking to achieve an evocative portrait of the daily life and festivities in the Alto de Minho mountains of northern Portugal. Director Miguel Filgueiras, an artist from the area, has created an extended, almost surreal montage of the region’s cultural heritage. The beauty and power of his imagery combine with the uniqueness of his approach to make Alto do Minho an original tour de force.

Rougarouing

A wild and boisterous film, Rougarouing takes its title from the Cajun term for "dangerous carousing. " The phrase is apt: this portrait of a bizarre tradition, rooted in a medieval “festival of begging,” is full of loud, muddy merrymaking in spectacular masks and costumes.


Sunday October 20, 2013 5:30pm - 6:45pm
People Center

6:00pm

Who Will Be a Gurkha

Kesang Tseten

2012 | 75 minutes | Nepal

U.S. Premiere


Sam Manekshaw, former chief of staff of the Indian Army, once quipped: “If a man says he is not afraid of dying, he is either lying or is a Gurkha.” The prestigious, centuries-old Nepali mercenary unit features prominently in the imaginations of young Nepali boys, but the inner workings of the Gurkha tradition and its trials remain obscure in America. Enter Kesang Tseten, whose new film Who Will Be a Gurkha depicts the fiercely competitive training and recruitment of new cadets with lucidity and poetry. At the British Gurkha Camp in Pokhara, the struggle sets the stage for introspection, hot tempers, caste prejudices, and occasionally, rambunctious singing. 

Co-presented by the Rubin Museum

This screening will be followed by a Q&A with Ashok Gurung, senior director, India China Institute.


Sunday October 20, 2013 6:00pm - 7:30pm
Kaufmann

6:30pm

And Who Taught You to Drive?

Driving lessons become life lessons in this poignant and funny documentary, which turns the efforts of three people attempting to get their local licenses in foreign countries into a sly and warmhearted exploration of cultural difference and acceptance. American Jake in Japan; Mirela, transplanted from Germany to India; and Hye-Won, recently arrived in Germany from South Korea—each of these charming protagonists illuminates the joys and frustrations of navigating new rules of the road, revealing along the way much of themselves and of their adoptive homes. German-born and U.S.-based filmmaker Andrea Thiele was inspired by her own experience with driving tests in other countries, and she infuses her film with deft touches to which anyone who loves to travel (or hates to drive) will relate to.


Sunday October 20, 2013 6:30pm - 7:54pm
Linder

8:30pm

Taxiway preceded by Top Ten Ldn

Taxiway

Alicia Harrison

2013 | 60 minutes | France, U.S.

U.S. Premiere | Director in Attendance

What does it mean to try to become who you want to be? How do you choose your life instead of letting it be shaped by circumstance? French-American director Alicia Harrison’s documentary poses these universal questions from an unlikely place: the interiors of taxicabs across New York City. She weaves together immigrant drivers’ stories of struggle, resignation, and hope, opening a rare window into the lives of the taxi drivers so many of us interact with regularly without ever really knowing. Harrison grew up in the city, and her sharp eye for people and place and sympathetic questioning help shape an intimate portrait of contemporary New York City as seen through its streets and the cab drivers who navigate them.

Co-presented by the Cultural Services of the French Embassy

Top Ten Ldn

Tara Manandhar

2013 | 10 min| U.K.

U.S. Premiere

A riot of joyful color and positive energy, Top Ten Ldn creates a visceral tapestry out of London’s cultural hotpot, crisscrossing the city to document a whirlwind of weddings and street carnivals, markets and park games—all the hustle and bustle of life on the street among one of the most diverse immigrant populations on earth.

 


Sunday October 20, 2013 8:30pm - 10:00pm
Kaufmann

10:00pm

Closing-Night Award Ceremony and Mariachi Dance Party

The Margaret Mead Filmmaker Award recipient(s) will be announced at a ceremony during the Closing Night Reception.  Introduced by Sevanne Kassarjian, granddaughter of Margaret Mead, the 2013 Filmmaker Award Jury will be on hand to present the award. 

 

Following the presentation and in honor of the diverse set of Mexican films featured in this year’s festival, the closing night celebrations feature a vibrant blend of old and new with a rousing performance by the electrifying Mariachi Flor de Toloache, the first and only all-female mariachi band founded in New York.

Admission is free with 2013 Mead Ticket Stub


Sunday October 20, 2013 10:00pm - Monday October 21, 2013 12:00am
Wallach Orientation Center